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The Book of Vegan

[Food Science] Women In Food Tech: 3 Scientists Pioneering the Future of Food

 

Women have long been pioneers in the field of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

In December 1903, physicist and chemist Marie Curie became the first woman in history to earn a Nobel Prize, for her breakthrough research in radioactivity. Augusta Ada King, the daughter of poet Lord Byron and better known as Ada Lovelace, is referred to as “the first computer programmer.” 

The British mathematician’s translation and personal notes on Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine—a prototype for a mechanical computer—inspired Alan Turing’s work on the first modern computer in the 1940s and made her a figurehead for women in technology. West Virginia-born mathematician Katherine G. Johnson’s work was critical to the first U.S.-crewed spaceflights and has been recognized as one of the first African-American women to work for NASA.

These are just a few examples; women have long been pioneers in the field of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). But, there’s still a huge disparity between the number of women and men in the field. According to data from the National Science Board, women make up just 28 percent of the STEM field. Breaking that down even further, white women hold the majority of those jobs. Continue

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